Rovio have decided to move away from the explored waters of Angry Birds and Bad Piggies and try something new for a change. The result is The Croods, a movie tie-in based on Dreamworks’ upcoming animation feature about a caveman family that tries to go modern and spectacular.

Spectacular is not something that we can say about The Croods – we barely accept that this is indeed a game created by Rovio. Not only that it brings nothing new to the table, but the things that it brings are pretty boring and poorly made, showing that creating a really good time management mix with a city building game requires a lot of resources.

The main goal of the game is to tame wild and funny beasts (like the Molarbear, the Bunny Beast, the Giralephant and so on) who in return produce resources which can be used to evolve the said animals, give you access to new ones and eventually let you stack up the resources for no real reason.

the croods review

Everything in The Croods takes time – and a lot of it – so sometimes your game sessions can be as long as three seconds until you’re left with nothing else to do. Capturing and taming the animals is a lengthy and boring process: you have to build a trap first and wait for the animal to be captured (which takes time), move it to the taming pen and feed it until it’s tamed (which takes even more time) and finally build a home for the animal and let it move there which, you probably guessed it, takes more time.

Once tamed, the creature has to be fed and it will produce resources, which will act as food for taming and feeding other animals or as ingredients for the magic soup that upgrades these creatures, making them produce more resources quickly.

And with this, we have covered everything (at least gameplay-wise) in The Croods. It’s true that we have missions in the game, but they lack creativity and usually resume to “Build a house for an animal” or “Capture this animal” and so on. It’s all a waiting game, and a rather boring one, and there are no real challenges or reward in this game to ever consider continuing to play it – which you will only do if for some reason you consider the characters and setting awesome. Which might be the case if you’re 10.

The graphics and sound are mediocre too – nothing spectacular, but mediocre and they capture well the mood and feel of the caveman-story that Dreamworks has planned for us. However, with decent visuals and acceptable music you can’t score big, and The Croods is more of a miss than anything else, proving that Rovio should stick to what they know to do best or bring some new people on, ready to take the challenge.

iTunes link: The Croods

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